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  • Understanding the current state of collaboration in the production and dissemination of adaptation knowledge in Namibia (August 2018)

    Understanding the current state of collaboration in the production and dissemination of adaptation knowledge in Namibia

     

    Understanding the current state of collaboration in the production and dissemination of adaptation knowledge in Namibia

    Authors: Chidiebere Ofoegbu, Mark New, Admire Mutsa Nyamwanza, Dian Spear

    Abstract: Adaptation to climate change is challenging in terms of managing knowledge flow among diverse actors. This paper examines the roles of key actors in Namibia in the production and dissemination of climate adaptation knowledge. The intention was to identify opportunities for enhancing collaboration among actors to facilitate knowledge flow and uptake in adaptation action. The Omusati Region was used as a case study in understanding the chain of interactions among actors from local/district to the national level vis-à-vis the production and dissemination of adaptation knowledge in Namibia. The researchers conducted key informant interviews with representatives of key organizations in the Namibian adaptation network operating in the Omusati Region. The selection of the organizations of interviewed respondents was based on a previous climate change adaptation stakeholder and influence network mapping exercise in the region. Results indicate that adaptation knowledge generation by organizations happens mainly in the context of other developmental services. Furthermore, most organizations generate their adaptation knowledge internally through their directorates of research and also through cooperation with other organizations. However, there is little or no collaboration between organizations with respect to dissemination of adaptation knowledge to intended targets. The study, therefore, recommends a more concerted effort towards improving collaboration between organizations, and with local communities in the dissemination of adaptation knowledge as a way of enhancing knowledge uptake. This will have practical implications for the improvement in the rate of knowledge uptake in adaptation actions, particularly at the local level. In this regard, the use of workshop and field day meetings show the best prospect for improving collaboration between organizations in knowledge dissemination. Read more here

     

     

  • Risks and responses in rural India: Implications for local climate change adaptation action (June 2018)

    Risks and responses in rural India: Implications for local climate change adaptation action

     

    Risks and responses in rural India: Implications for local climate change adaptation action

    Authors: Chandni Singh, Andaleeb Rahman, Arjun Srinivas, Amir Bazaz

    Abstract: People in drylands face multiple climatic and non-climatic risks and subsequently engage in various response strategies to manage these risks. Research on risk management has typically focussed on a static, location-specific understanding of risk and response. However, empirical evidence suggests that risks and vulnerability vary across space and time. Increasingly, responses traverse multiple locations e.g. people move across rural and urban areas, women move beyond the household/community to earn additional incomes. To highlight this dynamic reality of risks and responses, we study livelihood transitions in South India. We unpack risk and response portfolios across scales – household, community, and sub-national (district) levels – and classify them as coping, adaptive and maladaptive. Our findings emphasise that present responses do not necessarily qualify as climate change adaptation strategies. While certain strategies do improve household wellbeing in the short run, there is relatively lower evidence to suggest an increase in adaptive capacity to deal with climatic risks in the future. These findings point to critical gaps in understanding current risk management and how it can contribute to local adaptation policymaking and implementation. Read more here

     

     

  • Temperature and precipitation extremes under current, 1.5 °C and 2.0 °C global warming above pre-industrial levels over Botswana, and implications for climate change vulnerability (June 2018)

    Temperature and precipitation extremes under current, 1.5 °C and 2.0 °C global warming above pre-industrial levels over Botswana, and implications for climate change vulnerability

     

    Temperature and precipitation extremes under current, 1.5 °C and 2.0 °C global warming above pre-industrial levels over Botswana, and implications for climate change vulnerability

    Authors: Tiro Nkemelang, Mark New and Modathir Zaroug

    Abstract: Climate extremes are widely projected to become more severe as the global climate continues to warm due to anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions. These extremes often cause the most severe impacts on society. Therefore, the extent to which the extremes might change at regional level as the global climate warms from current levels to proposed policy targets of 1.5 and 2.0 °C above preindustrial levels need to be understood to allow for better preparedness and informed policy formulation. This paper analysed projected changes in temperature and precipitation extremes at 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 °C warming over Botswana, a country highly vulnerable to the impacts of climate change. Projected changes in temperature extremes are significantly different from each other at the three levels of global warming, across three main climatic zones in the country. Specifically, at 2.0 °C global warming relative to preindustrial, for the ensemble median: (a) country average warm spell duration index increases by 80, 65, 62 days per year across different climatic zones, approximately three (and two) times the change at 1.0 (1.5) °C; (b) cold night (TN10P) and cold day (TX10P) frequencies decrease by 12 and 9 days per year across all regions, respectively, while hot nights (TN90P) and hot days (TX90P) both increase by 8–9 days across all regions. Projected changes in drought-related indices are also distinct at different warming levels. Specifically: (a) projected mean annual precipitation decreases across the country by 5%–12% at 2 °C, 3%–8% at 1.5 °C and 2%–7% at 1.0 °C; (b) dry spell length (ALTCDD) increases by 15–19 days across the three climatic zones at 2.0 °C, about three (and two) times as much as the increase at 1.0 (1.5) °C. Ensemble mean projections indicate increases in heavy rainfall indices, but the inter-model spread is large, with no consistent direction of change, and so changes are not statistically significant. The implications of these changes in extreme temperature and precipitation for key socio-economic sectors are explored, and reveal progressively severe impacts, and consequent adaptation challenges for Botswana as the global climate warms from its present temperature of 1.0 °C above preindustrial levels to 1.5 °C, and then 2.0 °C. Read more here

     

     

  • Institutional perspectives of climate-smart agriculture: a systematic literature review (June 2018)

    Institutional perspectives of climate-smart agriculture: a systematic literature review

     

    Institutional perspectives of climate-smart agriculture: a systematic literature review

    Authors: Edmond Totin, Alcade C. Segnon, Marc Schut, Hippolyte Affognon, Robert B. Zougmoré, Todd Rosenstock and Philip K. Thornton

    Abstract: Climate-smart agriculture (CSA) is increasingly seen as a promising approach to feed the growing world population under climate change. The review explored how institutional perspectives are reflected in the CSA literature. In total, 137 publications were analyzed using institutional analysis framework, of which 55.5% make specific reference to institutional dimensions. While the CSA concept encompasses three pillars (productivity, adaptation, and mitigation), the literature has hardly addressed them in an integrated way. The development status of study sites also seems to influence which pillars are promoted. Mitigation was predominantly addressed in high-income countries, while productivity and adaptation were priorities for middle and low-income countries. Interest in institutional aspects has been gradual in the CSA literature. It has largely focused on knowledge infrastructure, market structure, and hard institutional aspects. There has been less attention to understand whether investments in physical infrastructure and actors’ interaction, or how historical, political, and social context may influence the uptake of CSA options. Rethinking the approach to promoting CSA technologies by integrating technology packages and institutional enabling factors can provide potential opportunities for effective scaling of CSA options. Read more here

     

     

  • Recognising the dynamics that surround drought impacts (June 2018)

    Recognising the dynamics that surround drought impacts.

     

    Recognising the dynamics that surround drought impacts

    Authors: Roger Few and Mark Tebboth

    Abstract: The argument that the impacts of extreme events are to large extent contingent on how stresses are managed – at various scales – is already well established in thought and practice. What we feel is not so often considered is the wider interaction of drought with other environmental and societal dynamics. These dynamics significantly shape the nature and extent of drought impacts, and, equally, shape the chances of success of drought response measures. Moreover, the rapidity of many of these societal dynamics is likely to outstrip the pace of long-term changes in climatic conditions, underlining why it is crucial not to focus narrowly on anthropogenic climate change and variability when discussing future risk from droughts. In this Think Note we use examples from research in East Africa to illustrate the interaction of drought with a set of other dynamics in the lives of pastoralists and agro-pastoralists. Read more here

     

     

  • Livelihoods on the edge without a safety net: The case of smallholder crop farming in North-Central Namibia (June 2018)

    Livelihoods on the edge without a safety net: The case of smallholder crop farming in North-Central Namibia

     

    Livelihoods on the edge without a safety net: The case of smallholder crop farming in North-Central Namibia

    Authors: Dian Spear, Angela Chappel

    Abstract: Semi-arid Namibia is marginal for agricultural production. Low soil fertility combined with low and variable rainfall restrict the livelihoods of smallholder farmers who often struggle to produce enough food. Although historically, communities have adopted a number of coping mechanisms, climate change threatens to further reduce agricultural production. There are many additional options available to smallholder farmers to adapt to climate change, but they are not necessarily adopting these measures despite having noticed increasing temperatures and declining rainfall. Semi-structured interviews were conducted in three villages in Onesi constituency to examine what agricultural practices smallholder crop farmers use, perception of changes in their yields, their perspective on future yields and whether they are planning on changing their agricultural practices. The results suggest that to sustain the livelihoods of rural communities in north-central Namibia, support is needed from local and regional authorities, as well as traditional and religious leaders to assist with enhancing access to information, enabling information sharing on adaptation options, and increasing awareness on climate change, its impacts and what can be done about it. In addition to this, implementation of the adaptation action also requires demonstration sites and building capacity to enable the development of self-help groups. Read more here

     

  • Observed aridity changes over the semi-arid regions of India in a warming climate (May, 2018)

     

    Observed aridity changes over the semiarid regions of India in a warming climate

    Authors: M. V. S. Ramarao, J. Sanjay, R. Krishnan, M. Mujumdar, Amir Bazaz, Aromar Revi

    Abstract: In this study, a quantitative assessment of observed aridity variations over the semiarid regions of India is performed for theperiod 1951–2005 using a dimensionless ratio of annual precipitation (P) and potential evapotranspiration (PET), estimated fromfive different observed gridded precipitation data sets. The climatological values and changes of this aridity index are found to besensitive to the choice of the precipitation observations. An assessment of P/PET estimated using the ensemble mean precipitationshows an increase in aridity over several semiarid regions of India, despite the sensitivity of P/PET variations across individualprecipitation data sets. Our results indicate that precipitation variations over the semiarid regions of India are outpacing thechanges in potential evapotranspiration and, thereby, influencing aridity changes in a significant manner. Our results furtherreveal a 10% expansion in the area of the semiarid regions during recent decades relative to previous decades, thus highlightingthe need for better adaptation strategies and mitigation planning for the semiarid regions in India. The sensitivity of aridity indexto multiple PET data sets can be an additional source of uncertainty and will be addressed in a future study. Read more here

     

  • Climate adaptation and water scarcity in Southern Africa (May, 2018)

     

    Climate Adaptation and Water Scarcity in Southern Africa

    Authors: Gina Ziervogel

    Abstract: Adaptation is only going to get more challenging as changes in the climate intensify, combining with the effects of rapid urbanization and the persistently high levels of poverty and inequality in Africa. Read more here

     

  • Climate change communication for adaptation: mapping communication pathways in semi-arid regions to identify research priorities (May 2018)

     

    Climate change communication for adaptation: mapping communication pathways in semi-arid regions to identify research priorities

    Authors: McGahey, D.J.and Lumosi, C.K

    Abstract: Communicating climate change effectively is an essential step towards creating an enabling environment for widespread societal adaptation. Yet less attention has been placed upon exploring what is known about effectively communicating climate change for adaptation in semi-arid regions, despite their uniqueness. The purpose of this paper is to review the literature on the climate adaptation communications challenge in the drylands of Africa and Asia. The paper maps out the current state of knowledge on how climate change information is communicated, accessed and used for adaptation within the drylands of Africa and Asia. It reveals insights into the unique contextual challenges faced by climate communications efforts in drylands, such as power and equity dimensions of knowledge generation and access. A move towards more dialogic forms of communication and knowledge generation is noted as one potential solution with clear tensions associated with issues of scale and the effectiveness of communication outcomes. Read the whole paper here.

     

     

  • Large-Scale Transdisciplinary Collaboration for Adaptation Research: Challenges and Insights (May 2018)

     

    Large-Scale Transdisciplinary Collaboration for Adaptation Research: Challenges and Insights

    Authors: Georgina Cundhill, Blane Harvey, Mark Tebboth, Logan Cochrane, Bruce Currie-Alder, Katharine Vincent, Jon Lawn, Robert. J. Nicholls, Lucia Scodanibbio, Anjal Prakash, Mark New, Philippus Wester, Michele Leone, Daniel Morchain, Eva Ludi,  Jesse DeMaria-Kinney, Ahmed Khan, and Marie-Eve Landry

    Abstract: An increasing number of research programs seek to support adaptation to climate change through the engagement of large-scale transdisciplinary networks that span countries and continents. While transdisciplinary research processes have been a topic of reflection, practice, and refinement for some time, these trends now mean that the global change research community needs to reflect and learn how to pursue collaborative research on a large scale. This paper shares insights from a seven-year climate change adaptation research program that supports collaboration between more than 450 researchers and practitioners across four consortia and 17 countries. The experience confirms the importance of attention to careful design for transdisciplinary collaboration, but also highlights that this alone is not enough. The success of well-designed transdisciplinary research processes is also strongly influenced by relational and systemic features of collaborative relationships. Relational features include interpersonal trust, mutual respect, and leadership styles, while systemic features include legal partnership agreements, power asymmetries between partners, and institutional values and cultures.

    In the new arena of large-scale collaborative science efforts, enablers of transdisciplinary collaboration include dedicated project coordinators, leaders at multiple levels, and the availability of small amounts of flexible funds to enable nimble responses to opportunities and unexpected collaborations. Read the whole publication here

     

  • Wells and Well-being in South India Gender Dimensions of Groundwater Dependence (April 2018)

     

    Wells and Well-being in South India Gender Dimensions of Groundwater Dependence

    Authors: Divya Susan Solomon, Nitya Rao

    Abstract: Groundwater has played a pivotal role in transforming the rural agrarian landscape, augmenting rural livelihoods and improving household well-being. What role does the growing prevalence and importance of groundwater play in intra-household relations, particularly the gendered divisions of labour and use of assets? The impacts of failed borewells on gendered vulnerabilities, identities and well-being have been explored. Research indicates that groundwater usage in semi-arid regions has increased the short-term resilience of communities in the region, but has simultaneously increased gendered risks, especially for smallholders, by promoting unsustainable livelihood trends and risky coping strategies to groundwater shortages. Read the full publication here

     

     

  • Tracing back to move ahead: a review of development pathways that constrain adaptation futures (March 2018)

     

    Tracing back to move ahead: a review of development pathways that constrain adaptation futures

    Authors: Sumetee Pahwa Gajjar, Chandni Singh &Tanvi Deshpande

    Abstract: Exponents of transformation in the context of climate change strongly articulate the challenges associated with switching from current, potentially maladaptive development trajectories, onto future pathways that are climate responsive. Although scholarship on maladaptation highlights the dangers of path dependency, the concept is under-applied for understanding the potential outcomes of development trajectories that result in what we call an adaptation-constrained space. By conducting case-study analysis based on secondary review, we trace implications of particular development trajectories, in urban and rural India. The first case examines how urbanization in Bangalore city has decreased the capacity to respond to concurrent risks of flooding and water scarcity while the second charts how agricultural policies in India have narrowed local capacity to deal with climatic and non-climatic uncertainties. Using a historical perspective, we identify triggers of change in local and regional development, which have led to an adaptation-constrained space. We find that both pathways display irreversible lock-ins and inherent trade-offs which entrench inequities (through differential capacity and agency to access resources and influence future development). We argue that such development pathways are potentially maladaptive. Whether they are expected to deal with climate impacts or to meet development goals, the fact that they constrain current and future adaptive capacity at multiple levels, is why we consider them maladaptive. As India undertakes large investments in development and climate change adaptation, this paper adds to the relatively low policy debate on how development trajectories, physically and socially, limit the possibilities for future adaptation. We propose that policy-makers and planners first acknowledge how development trajectories acquire dominance, and then begin empowering normative alternatives that open future adaptation options. More

     

     

     

  • Using Life Histories to Understand Temporal Vulnerability to Climate Change in Highly Dynamic Contexts (December 2017)

     

    Title: Using Life Histories to Understand Temporal Vulnerability to Climate Change in Highly Dynamic Contexts

    Authors: Chandni Singh

    Abstract: Climate change research has often been critiqued for focussing on abstract impacts far into the future that are not perceived and understood in the context of daily life. This case proposes the use of life history interviewing as a methodological approach to study how people perceive and negotiate multiple risks to their lives and livelihoods (one of which may be climate variability) in highly dynamic contexts such as dryland areas. The case examines vulnerability to climate change (among other risks) at household and intrahousehold levels to uncover how personal attributes such as caste, age, and gender, as well as contextual factors such as reduced natural resources and socio-political trajectories shape people’s daily lives, their livelihood choices, and aspirations for the future. Using research conducted in two districts in Southern India, I demonstrate how life histories can expand the existing methodological toolkit available to social scientists working on climate change vulnerability and contribute to understanding the temporality inherent in livelihood decisions, the often-intangible aspirations that motivate people’s choices, and how household responses are tapestries of negotiations made within their immediate and larger environment. Read more here

     

     

  • Mental models of food security in rural Mali (December 2017)

    Mental models of food security in rural Mali

    Authors: Louies Rivers III, Udita Sanga, Amadou Sidibe, Alexa Wood, Rajiv Paudel, Sandra T. Marquart‑Pyatt, Arika Ligmann‑Zielinska, Laura Schmitt Olabisi, Eric Jing Du, Saweda Liverpool‑Tasie

    Abstract:

    Recent estimates indicate that 12% of the global population is likely to have suffered from chronic hunger, due to lack of enough food for an active and healthy life. West Africa, specifically across the Sahel countries, is acutely vulnerable to food insecurity concerns. Mail is emblematic of this problem with approximately 4.6 million citizens considered food insecure. Food security poses formidable challenges. Studies have shown that in order to understand food insecurity and identify steps for effective intervention, there is a need to apprehend the food systems and food in/security in a holistic way beyond production alone. Understanding the behavioral aspects of food security is critical in the African context where agriculture, while oriented toward basic subsistence, remains embedded in social system including the social dynamics of households, extended families, and communities. This exploratory work focuses on developing a nuanced understanding of food security and adaptive behaviors to current challenges to food security at the household level with a distinct focus on inter- and intra-family behavioral dynamics in rural, southern Mali. Using mental models methodology, we developed two influence diagrams and a set of sub-models that represent rural households’ mental models of food security under traditional conditions and under conditions of external pressures. These models suggest that food security in rural Mali is at considerable risk due to the influence of external challenges, such as climate change, on traditional behaviors and a lack of easily accessible corresponding behavioral adaptations. Read more here

     

  • Can scenario planning catalyse transformational change? Evaluating a climate change policy case study in Mali (November 2017)

    Can scenario planning catalyse transformational change? Evaluating a climate change policy case study in Mali

    Authors: Edmond Totin, James R. Butler, Amadou Sidibé, Samuel Partey, Philip K. Thornton, Ramadjita Tabo

    Abstract: The potential of participatory scenario processes to catalyse individual and collective transformation and policy change is emphasised in several theoretical reflections. Participatory scenario processes are believed to enhance participants’ systems understanding, learning, networking and subsequent changes in practices. However, limited empirical evidence is available to prove these assumptions. This study aimed to contribute to this knowledge gap. It evaluates whether these outcomes had resulted from the scenario planning exercise and the extent to which they can contribute to transformational processes. The research focused on a district level case study in rural Mali which examined food security and necessary policy changes in the context of climate change. The analyses of interviews with 26 participants carried out 12 months after the workshop suggested positive changes in learning and networking, but only limited influence on systems understanding. There was limited change in practice, but the reported changes occurred at the individual level, and no policy outcomes were evident. However, by building the adaptive capacity of participants, the scenario process had laid the foundation for ongoing collective action, and potential institutional and policy transformation. We conclude that to enhance the resilience of agricultural and food systems under climate change, participatory scenario processes require a broader range of cross-scale actors’ engagement to support transformational changes. Such process will both catalyse deeper learning and more effective link with national level policymaking process. In addition, individual scenario planning exercises are unlikely to generate sufficient learning and reflection, and instead they should form one component of more extensive and deliberate stakeholder engagement, learning and evaluation processes. Read it here

     

     

  • Using participatory modeling processes to identify sources of climate risk in West Africa (October 2017)

     

    Using participatory modeling processes to identify sources of climate risk in West Africa

    Authors: Laura Schmitt Olabisi, Saweda Liverpool-Tasie, Louie RiversIII, Arika Ligmann-Zielinska, Jing Du, Riva Denny, Sandra Marquart-Pyatt, Amadou Sidibé

    Abstract: Participatory modeling has been widely recognized in recent years as a powerful tool for dealing with risk and uncertainty. By incorporating multiple perspectives into the structure of a model, we hypothesize that sources of risk can be identified and analyzed more comprehensively compared to traditional ‘expert-driven’ models. However, one of the weaknesses of a participatory modeling process is that it is typically not feasible to involve more than a few dozen people in model creation, and valuable perspectives on sources of risk may therefore be absent. We sought to address this weakness by conducting parallel participatory modeling processes in three countries in West Africa with similar climates and smallholder agricultural systems, but widely differing political and cultural contexts. Stakeholders involved in the agricultural sector in Ghana, Mali, and Nigeria participated in either a scenario planning process or a causal loop diagramming process, in which they were asked about drivers of agricultural productivity and food security, and sources of risk, including climate risk, between the present and mid-century (2035–2050). Participants in all three workshops identified both direct and indirect sources of climate risk, as they interact with other critical drivers of agricultural systems change, such as water availability, political investment in agriculture, and land availability. We conclude that participatory systems methods are a valuable addition to the suite of methodologies for analyzing climate risk and that scientists and policy-makers would do well to consider dynamic interactions between drivers of risk when assessing the resilience of agricultural systems to climate change.

     

     

     

  • Multi-scale governance in agriculture systems: Interplay between national and local institutions around the production dimension of food security in Mali (September 2017)

     

    Multi-scale governance in agriculture systems: Interplay between national and local institutions around the production dimension of food security in Mali

    Authors: Amadou Sidibé, Edmond Totin, Mary Thompson-Hall, Oumar T. Traoré, Pierre C. Sibiry Traoré, Laura Schmitt Olabisi

    Abstract: Enforcement of rules and laws designed at the national level is still one of the dominant institutional mechanisms for effective multiscale governance in most countries. At times, such blanket regulations are not only unable to meet practical needs at local levels, but they may conflict with local institutional logics, thereby creating new challenges. This study looks at three institutional arrangements in the agriculture and food security sector in the district of Koutiala, Mali to analyse the institutional variety across scale and the underlying institutional logics. On one side, the Cooperative Law as well as the Seed Law both designed at national level to enable famers’ access to agriculture services and improved seeds have yielded mixed results with regard to anticipated outcomes. The cooperative law is believed to degrade the social cohesion and the mutual support on which vulnerable farmers rely when facing climatic and non-climatic risks whereas the new seed system is found onerous and unaffordable for farmers. On the other side, the local convention for the management of natural resources established as part of ongoing decentralised governance policy seems to resonate with local culture but challenged by other stakeholders. Through exploring these cases, this paper tests bricolage as an analytical framework for doing an institutional diagnostic. It aims at contributing to methodological and theoretical insights on the way sustainable institutions can be generated in conflicting institutional logics in the context of multi-scale governance.

     

     

  • Transformation, adaptation and development: relating concepts to practice (September 2017)

     

    Transformation, adaptation and development: relating concepts to practice

    Authors: Roger Few, Daniel Morchain, Dian Spear, Adelina Mensah, Ramkumar Bendapudi

    In this paper, a team of ASSAR researchers and practitioners examine the relevance of transformation for adaptation research and adaptation practice. They aim to shift conversations about transformation from being theoretical, abstract and aspirational, to being able to inform concrete action. To help researchers and practitioners understand if and how transformation might be occurring or be encouraged, they propose a set of questions that could be asked of an adaptation activity. By helping to split these activities into distinct categories, this process can provide clarity around the objectives of an adaptation response and the larger changes sought. This in turn can help to reduce the risk of negative impacts on vulnerable or marginalised people, and ensure that the societal and systemic implications of a specific transformation are better understood from the outset.

     

     

  • Gendered vulnerabilities to climate change: Insights from the semiarid regions of Africa and Asia (September 2017)

     

    Gendered vulnerabilities to climate change: Insights from the semiarid regions of Africa and Asia

    Authors: Nitya Rao, Elaine T. Lawson, Wapula N. Raditloaneng, Divya Solomon, Margaret N. Angula

    Abstract: Emerging and on-going research indicates that vulnerabilities to impacts of climate change are gendered. Still, policy approaches aimed at strengthening local communities’ adaptive capacity largely fail to recognize the gendered nature of everyday realities and experiences. This paper interrogates some of the emerging evidence in selected semi-arid countries of Africa and Asia from a gender perspective, using water scarcity as an illustrative example. It emphasizes the importance of moving beyond the counting of numbers of men and women to unpacking relations of power, of inclusion and exclusion in decision-making, and challenging cultural beliefs that have denied equal opportunities and rights to differently positioned people, especially those at the bottom of economic and social hierarchies. Such an approach would make policy and practice more relevant to people’s differentiated needs and responses.

    Further reading: UN Brief ASSAR Brief

     

  • The utility of weather and climate information for adaptation decision-making: current uses and future prospects in Africa and India (May 2017)

     

    The utility of weather and climate information for adaptation decision-making: current uses and future prospects in Africa and India

    Authors: Chandni Singh, Joseph Daron, Amir Bazaz, Gina Ziervogel, Dian Spear, Jagdish Krishnaswamy, Modathir Zaroug & Evans Kituyi

    In their recent review article, Chandni Singh and her collaborators explored if, and how, farmers in the semi-arid regions of Africa and India use content provided by climate information services to guide their farming decisions. Based on their findings they argue that efforts to adapt to climate variability and climate change can be strengthened by considering how weather and climate information is used at different scales of time and place, by different people, and towards different outcomes. They developed a framework that captures this idea, and argue that the uptake of short-term weather advisories and seasonal forecasts have created a demand for climate information that can be leveraged to inform adaptation decision-making. Read more

    Watch the video below

     

     

  • How do we assess vulnerability to climate change in India? A systematic review of literature (February 2017)

     

    How do we assess vulnerability to climate change in India? A systematic review of literature

    Authors: Chandni Singh, Tanvi Deshpande, Ritwika Basu

    When trying to prioritise adaptation efforts, it is crucial to understand which people, places and systems are the most vulnerable to climate changes.  This is particularly important in countries like India where multiple non-climatic risks already interact with socio-economic differences to make and keep people vulnerable. So how do we determine those most vulnerable to climate change? Many different vulnerability assessment tools have been designed for this purpose, but their effectiveness has not been interrogated. Through a review of key literature the authors set out to do this interrogation, asking these four questions for each assessment tool:

    1. How is vulnerability conceptualised (vulnerability of who/what, vulnerability to what)?

    2. Who does the vulnerability assessments?

    3. How is vulnerability assessed (which methods, at what scale of time and place)?

    4. How do these methods affect the assessment outcomes?

    The findings raise important concerns about the ways that assessment tools are designed and implemented:

    • Assessment methods are affected by the disciplinary traditions, methodological approaches, and often-unstated motivations of those who design them.

    • Although most assessments acknowledge the importance of scale (of time and place) in determining vulnerability, very few actually integrate scale in their methods.

    • Such methodological myopia potentially overlooks how social differences, ecological shifts, and institutional dynamics construct and perpetuate vulnerability.

    • Most vulnerability assessments are performed in rural areas with relatively few performed in urban and peri-urban settlements. Yet it is in these transition areas that vulnerabilities can be heightened. Read more

  • Hydrogeological delineation of groundwater vulnerability to droughts in semi-arid areas of western Ahmednagar district (December 2016)

     

    Hydrogeological delineation of groundwater vulnerability to droughts in semi-arid areas of western Ahmednagar district

    Authors: Renie Thomas, Vijayasekaran Duraisamy

    Abstract: Groundwater, a renewable and finite natural resource, is a vital source of sustenance for humans and different ecosystems in the semi-arid regions. Rapid population growth in the last three decades has caused a rise in water demand which has inadvertently posed a stress on its availability. Occurrence of groundwater in the Deccan Volcanic Province is governed by the subsurface hydrogeological heterogeneity of basaltic lava flows and by the presence of geological structures like dykes, sills and fractures that influence spatial & vertical groundwater flow. The main objective of this paper is to map and assess areas that are naturally most susceptible to groundwater scarcity and at risk of depletion due to over extraction. The current study involves a field hydrogeological mapping that was integrated with remote sensing and GIS to delineate areas. This technique was based on using different thematic layers viz. lithology, slope, land-use and land cover, lineament, drainage, soil type, depth to groundwater and annual rainfall. Additionally, pumping tests were carried out to classify the study area into different hydrogeological typologies to help delineate communities that are most vulnerable to subsurface heterogeneity. This paper attempts to underline the groundwater scarcity zones based on different influencing thematic layers and provide a robust methodology to prioritize areas vulnerable to groundwater unavailability, by categorizing the study area into different vulnerable class types – extreme, high, moderate and low.

    Further reading: Vulnerability to groundwater drought in semi-arid areas of western Ahmednagar District

     

  • Adaptation to climate change or non-climatic stressors in semi-arid regions? Evidence of gender differentiation in three agrarian districts of Ghana (November 2016)

    Adaptation to climate change or non-climatic stressors in semi-arid regions? Evidence of gender differentiation in three agrarian districts of Ghana

    Authors: Abubakari Ahmed, Elaine T. Lawson, Adelina Mensah, Chris Gordon, Jon Padgham

    Abstract: With the increasing impacts of climate change in Africa, a relationship between rainfall and yields in semi-arid Ghana has been observed. Drawing insights from three agrarian societies in the semi-arid region of Ghana using qualitative research methods, the study reports how people currently deal with climate variability as insight on how they will deal with climate change in the future. Read more

     

  • What if gender became an essential, standard element of Vulnerability Assessments? (November 2015)

     

    What if gender became an essential, standard element of Vulnerability Assessments?

    Authors: Daniel Morchain, Giorgia Prati, Frances Kelsey & Lauren Ravon 

    Abstract: Vulnerability Assessments (VAs) can be useful tools for providing key insights for nongovernment organisations and other development actors, including governments. Not only can they provide an extensive, ‘landscape-wide’ understanding of vulnerability and its underlying causes in a specific context, but this understanding can be jointly owned by all participants. They can thus be used for designing risk reduction and resilience-building measures, programmes, or projects that affect specific groups within a community or the landscape. Beyond that, VAs can provide a platform that promotes interaction among otherwise disconnected stakeholders, as well as the evidence and argumentation for community groups to engage in advocacy with local and municipal/district authorities. This article draws on our combined experience as development practitioners, and considers what we have learnt about the importance of integrating gender issues into VAs. Read more here